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Dog from Yukon finds a pile of cooked chickens in the forest

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Who would release 40 fried chickens into the forests of the Yukon?

That's the question a woman from Ibex Valley is asking herself after her dog Ossie sniffed out what would be a goldmine of tasty treats for many dogs.

Linda Lamers was walking with Ossie when the dog picked up the scent and found over 40 roast chickens that had been dumped in a pile in the woods. They were also served chicken fingers and French fries.

For the dog it may have been a dream come true, but for Lamers it was anything but ideal.

“I just want to know why,” said Lamers. “It's a big, smelly pile of cooked chicken.”

What was also disturbing was where the food was left.

“They weren't in the ditch,” said Lamers. “They must have been dragged there on purpose.”

Ossie was minding his own business when he happened to discover 40 roast chickens, chicken fingers, nuggets and chips dumped in the woods of the Ibex Valley. Ossie was minding his own business when he happened to discover 40 fried chickens, chicken fingers, nuggets and chips dumped in the woods of the Ibex Valley.

Ossie was minding his own business when he happened to discover 40 fried chickens, chicken fingers, nuggets and chips dumped in the woods of the Ibex Valley.

Ossie, maybe think of chicken. (Linda Lamers)

The discarded food was located just 500 meters from residential buildings, including Lamers' property.

“It's a huge attractant,” Lamers said. “I don't even put out birdseed this time of year because I'm afraid it will attract bears.”

Nick Hogan, conservation officer at Yukon National Park, admits that boiled chicken is “not something we normally find.”

“Yukon residents are generally quite conscientious when it comes to disposing of their garbage legally,” he said.

“It's never good to find something like that… Especially this time of year when there's not a lot of food for animals right now – so yeah, it's not great to find something like that.”

Hogan said many animals are out looking for food this time of year, including bears, foxes and coyotes.

Not only does wasted food attract dangerous animals, it also violates the law.

“There is a risk of a fine for littering,” Hogan said.

Fines start at $500 but can quickly escalate if, as in this case, the chicken and fries attract wildlife and the animals become a nuisance.

Lamers says fortunately, since the food was dumped, no wildlife has been attracted to her or her neighbors' homes, and conservation officers have since removed the trash from the area.

“We haven't seen any bears and our dog is fine,” said Lamers. “We have to keep a close eye on him now because he now has a strong incentive to run over there.”

Anyone with information about this unusual case of littering is asked to contact Environment Yukon.